WELCOME TO THE YORK LEARNING CENTER PLANETARIUM.

Formed in 1989, the non-profit York County Astronomical Society aims to promote interest, public education, and advancement of the science of astronomy. In addition to planetarium shows, the society presents regular public sky watches and astronomy classes.

Featured shows Will Return SEPTEMBER 26, 2017

This month we are featuring a children’s program, One World, One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure. See movie trailers below.

 

Seating-Please note: All planetarium programs will start on time. Seating is limited and all seats are available on a first come first serve basis. As the program requires the room to be dark, there will be no seating once the program has begun. No food or beverages allowed. Be courteous of others and please silence your cell phone, camera, or other devices, digital or not, that may make sound or light. These lights and sounds can be very disruptive during the program. Thank You.

 

May 13, 2017 Afternoon Shows

Saturday, May 13, 2017 at: 2:00pm, "One World, One Sky", at 2:40pm, "StarWatch", and at 3:20pm "Rusty Rockets Last Blast!". See: Afternoon shows

May 13, 2017, 2017. Evening Shows

 Saturday, May 13, 2017, 2017 at 7:00pm, "Seeing!", at 7:40pm "StarWatch" and at 8:20pm "Hot and Energetic Universe ". See: Evening shows

Planetarium Location

The planetarium is located in the York Learning Center at 301 East 6th Avenue in York. See detailed: Directions

Google Maps

May 13, 2017 Afternoon Shows

Admission

Admission is $4.00 for adults, $3.00 for children and seniors. Admission to any second or third show is $1.00
Cash and most credit and debit cards are accepted.

"One World, One Sky" 2:00 p.m.

A Fulldome Planetarium Show

Fulldome" designed to envelop the audience 180 degrees when projected on planetarium dome.

In One World, One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure! Elmo and Big Bird live in the United States and Hu Hu Zhu lives far away in China, but they discovered that they still see the same stars at night! The word for star in Chinese is “xing xing” (pronounced sing sing). How many “xing xing” do you see in this sky? When Elmo and Hu Hu Zhu "travel" to the moon, they discover some basic but surprising scientific facts. For example, they can't fly a kite there because there is no wind. The fuzzy friends then excitedly realize that children like to fly kites in both China and the United States! Age Range 3 - 7 years. Runtime 25 minutes. Watch trailer below.

“StarWatch Live” 2:40 p.m.

What can be seen with a telescope tonight?
How do I find the North Star?
Is there really a bear in the sky?
Why do stars have different colors?
What are the names of the brightest stars?


“StarWatch Live” Become a star watcher by exploring the current month's night sky in the planetarium, locate visible planets and constellations, and enjoy some sky lore. This live presentation is for the whole family, presented by the York Learning Center Planetarium director, using the star projector to its fullest capabilities. Receive a star map and get a tour of tonight’s sky. Runtime:35 minutes.

"Rusty Rockets Last Blast!" 3:20 p.m.

Fulldome" designed to envelop the audience 180 degrees when projected on planetarium dome.

  “Rusty Rocket’s Last Blast”, Rusty Rocket has decided to retire from teaching rocket physics and this will be his last blast, and he already has plans for how he will spend his free time. Still there is one final mission to command: an introductory tour of the solar system for a new class of rocket rookies focusing on the wide variety of planetary environments. Along the way, we learn Rusty is related to every famous spacecraft to explore the solar system. He also emphasizes the immense distances between the planets using cars and jets for comparison. Runtime: 35 minutes. See preview below.

May 13, 2017 Evening Shows

Admission

Admission is $4.00 for adults, $3.00 for children and seniors. Admission to any second or third show is $1.00
Cash and most credit and debit cards are accepted.

"Seeing!" 7:00 p.m.

A Fulldome Planetarium Show

Fulldome" designed to envelop the audience 180 degrees when projected on planetarium dome.

Ride a photon across the galaxy to your mind's eye and experience how we see. “SEEING!” follows a photon’s creation and journey across the galaxy to a young stargazer’s eye. The viewer follows the photon into the girl’s eye, learning the structures of the eye and their functions, prior to taking a ride on the optic nerve. SEEING is a 22-minute full-immersion planetarium program, which will use hemispheric 2D and 3D animations and video to teach how human vision works. Imagery from all over the world including humanity, landscapes, skyscapes, wildlife and of space will be the backdrop for photo-realistic animations, which will be used to create a story of a photon's’ journey through the eye and its conversion to an electrochemical impulse that then travels the neuro pathways of the brain to the various centers that create the image the brain sees. General audiences 22 min.

“StarWatch Live” 7:40 p.m.

What can be seen with a telescope tonight?
How do I find the North Star?
Is there really a bear in the sky?
Why do stars have different colors?
What are the names of the brightest stars?


“StarWatch Live” Become a star watcher by exploring the current month's night sky in the planetarium, locate visible planets and constellations, and enjoy some sky lore. This live presentation for the whole family, presented by the York Learning Center Planetarium director, using the star projector to its fullest capabilities. Receive a star map and get a tour of tonight’s sky. Runtime 35 minutes.

"Hot and Energetic Universe " at 8:20 p.m.

A Fulldome Planetarium Show

Fulldome" designed to envelop the audience 180 degrees when projected on planetarium dome.

"The Hot and Energetic Universe” presents the fascinating world of high energy astrophysics. High energy astrophysics plays a key role in understanding the universe, as these radiations reveal the processes in the hot and violent universe. High energy astrophysics probes hot gas in clusters of galaxies, which are the most massive objects in the universe. It also probes hot gas accreting around supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies. Finally, high energy radiation provides important information about our own galaxy, neutron stars, supernova remnants and stars like our Sun which emit copious amounts of high-energy radiation. Come and learn about your hot and energetic universe! Ages 8 to adult 29 min.

Some of the planetariums shows are provided by British Fulldome Institute.

 

The York County Astronomical Society, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the science of astronomy. *Formed in 1989, the non-profit York County Astronomical Society aims to promote interest, public education, and advancement of the science of astronomy. In addition to planetarium shows, the society presents regular public sky watches and astronomy classes.

 Watch Video: The Known Universe

See other shows upcoming.: Planetarium Programs

The planetarium is located in the York Learning Center at 301 East 6th Avenue in York.

For more information contact: Stars@YCAS.org